Search

Coming to our Senses

Psychologist Fritz Perls advised us to “lose our minds and come to our senses.” Beneath the clever word play is important advice. We have a tendency to get so caught up in our thinking, our projecting into the future, our attempts to deal with the past, and our narratives about what is going on in our lives that we forget we have a body.

Try this: close your eyes and take a few mindful breaths. Now focus on the sensation of your hair on your head. Notice this quite precisely. Then focus in the same careful way on the sensation of clothing on your shoulder. Then note the sensation of the chair you’re sitting on against your back. Next, in the same precise and careful way, notice what the clothes against the tops of your thighs feel like. Lastly, notice the sensation of shoes on your feet. Repeat this, taking at least twenty or thirty seconds for each area.

Now notice the effect this has had on your consciousness. Do you see that you are a little more centered, a little more present?

The Buddha called mindfulness of the body the first foundation of mindfulness. Without it, we could say that we are a disembodied presence. Or perhaps, that we are scarcely present at all.

0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Facing Mortality

Perhaps because of the Covid virus, it seems that I am having more conversations than ever with people about death. Unfortunately, there was no course in graduate school that taught me what to say ab

The Winds are Blowing

It’s a windy day here in New Mexico. More harbingers of the winter that is coming, which by all accounts looks like it is going to be a difficult one. This windy day made me think about another kind

On Not Becoming a Buddha

When you meditate, when you practice mindfulness in daily life, don’t aim at becoming a Buddha: Just meditate to enjoy the peace of meditation. Just be mindful to enjoy being mindful. When you eat you

Screen Shot 2020-12-20 at 7.46.41 PM.png
Screen Shot 2020-12-20 at 7.47.18 PM.png
Screen Shot 2020-12-20 at 7.47.07 PM.png
Screen Shot 2020-12-20 at 7.46.49 PM.png
Screen Shot 2020-12-20 at 7.46.58 PM.png

Books

Contact Me

Mail: Tom@mindfulpsychology.com

Tel: (505) 242-2603